My 2nd book: What Drives Quality

A Deep Dive into Software Quality with Practical Solutions for Delivering High-Quality Products

Now available in paperback: BenLinders Amazon Bol.

For software developers and testers, architects, product owners and managers, agile coaches, Scrum masters, project managers, and operational and senior managers

Buy it:  Amazon  Leanpub  webshop  Other stores

  • practical and actionable
  • roadmap to better software
  • must-read for all persons contributing to the development or enhancement of software
  • useful advice in an easy-to-read book
  • valuable contribution to professional software engineering practice
  • welcome addition to the agile literature

The book What Drives Quality explores how quality plays a role in all of the software development phases, it takes a deep dive into quality by listing the relevant factors of development activities that drive the quality of products. It provides a lean approach to quality, which analyses the full development chain from customer request to delivering products.

Featured on  InfoQ  SPaMCast  Yours Productly  Software Testing Magazine  Leanpub  …

Note: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

It’s a small but powerful book which, just like my successful first book Getting Value out of Agile Retrospectives, provides many ideas, suggestions, and examples, that you can use in your daily work.

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About the book

Many methods for product quality improvement start by investigating the problems and then work their way back to the point where the problem started. For instance audits and root cause analysis work this way. But what if you could prevent problems from happening, by building an understanding what drives quality, thus enabling to take action before problems actually occur?

The book What Drives Quality provides a lean approach to quality, which analyses the full development chain from customer request to delivering products. It focuses on the interaction between all involved in delivering high-quality software to customers, quicker, at a lower cost.

I’m aiming this book at software developers and testers, architects, product owners and managers, agile coaches, Scrum masters, project managers, and operational and senior managers who consider quality to be important.

There are many great books on defining customer needs/requirements/user stories, software craftsmanship, QA/testing, DevOps/continuous delivery, and managing Agile teams and organizations. But until now there wasn’t a book that ties it all together. What Drives Quality explores practices from the different domains using an integrated end-to-end quality framework. This book enables professionals working in different areas to build a shared view of software quality and work together to deliver high-quality products.

This book is based on my experience as a developer, tester, team leader, project manager, quality manager, process manager, consultant, coach, trainer, and adviser in Agile, Lean, Quality and Continuous Improvement. It takes a deep dive into quality with views from different perspectives and provides ideas, suggestions, practices, and experiences that will help you to improve quality of the products that your organization is delivering.

Feedback on this book is very much appreciated. Please send your suggestions, comments, ideas or questions to BenLinders@gmail.com.

This book is based on the Blog series What Drives Quality.

Getting the book

The first edition of this book has been released on September 30, 2017.

You can get your copy of What Drives Quality i 1st edition:

  • in my webshop for €8,99: Instantly get the current version in PDF, ePub, and Kindle format. Includes Free Lifetime Support via BenLinders@gmail.com.
  • on Amazon for $9,99: You will get the ebook delivered to your Kindle device.
  • on Leanpub for $9,99: Instantly get the current version in PDF, ePub, and Kindle format and receive all future updates.
  • in all major on-line bookstores.

Second edition

I’m updating and expanding my successful second book What Drives Quality to publish a second edition. Intermediate versions are released through Leanpub: What Drives Quality.

The second edition contains additions throughout the book. I have added many practices and experience stories to the existing chapters. I also added a new chapter, Driving Quality, where I explore how to measure and analyze quality, describe the Project Defect Model, and show how you can steer quality in agile. This edition also contains a second foreword by Jan van Moll, Senior Forensic Investigator and Head of Quality & Regulatory at Philips Healthcare.

What more is new in the second edition:

  • Using use cases for specifying requirements.
  • How personas can be used to understand the users.
  • The “dark side” of commitment.
  • How burnout impacts quality.
  • Lean startup, using feedback to learn and develop the right products.

The book has grown already from 117 to 172 pages, almost a 50% increase. More will be added in the coming weeks.

Have you read What Drives Quality? I’d like to receive your feedback to further update the book and publish the second edition.

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    Which quality practices from the do you use? How do they help you to deliver high-quality products?

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    Testimonials

    “This book is a succinct summary of what we know about software quality and how to apply it. It can be read in “agile time”, and delivers a solid overview that can set readers on course to higher quality, lower risk software.”
    Bill Curtis, Director Consortium for IT Software Quality and Foreword Author

    “I recommend the book for anyone who wants to achieve quality or wants to avoid being the victim of self-inflicted or other quality issues.”
    William R. Corcoran, Editor of the Firebird Forum

    “Ben’s book is a reflection of his deep knowledge and experience helping teams and organisations identify what quality is in software, why it matters and how to optimise the right qualities for a product.”
    Shane Hastie, Director of Agile Learning Programs at ICAgile

    “Ben’s book is practical and actionable. I am already using the ideas in my coaching work with teams and their executive leaders.”
    Brandi Olson, Agile Strategy, Lean Data, and Coaching

    More information

    Language: English
    Size: 117 pages
    ISBN: 978-94-92119-14-8
    Published: September 30, 2017
    Publisher: Ben Linders Publishing

    About the author

    Ben Linders is an Independent Consultant in Agile, Lean, Quality, and Continuous Improvement, based in The Netherlands. As an adviser, coach, and trainer, he helps organizations with deploying effective software development and management practices.

    Ben is an active member of networks on Agile, Lean, and Quality, and a well-known workshop facilitator and speaker. He is the author of the successful books Getting Value out of Agile Retrospectives and What Drives Quality, and creator of the Agile Self-assessment Game.

    Books on Software Quality

    The below-mentioned books are referenced in What Drives Quality.

    Contact information

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    My 2nd book What Drives Quality is available on Amazon, in my webshop, and in all other major bookstores.

    Many methods for product quality improvement start by investigating the problems, and then working their way back to the point where the problem started. For instance audits and Root Cause Analysis work this way. But what if you could prevent problems from happening, by building an understanding what drives quality, thus enabling to take action before problems actually occur? (more…)

    This Post Has 5 Comments

    1. Natarajan Sankaran

      We always claim that our focus should be on improving the Quality but in reality the organization never spent such efforts during project realization ,Always we work on corrective measures once the defects is found by customer and no such preventive measures are getting installed.May be the organization practising six sigma will have better yield,now a days there is a Agile fever everywhere and focus is only to reduce product lead time to market with “Just enough” quality.

      1. BenLinders

        Fully agree with you. It is cheaper to prevent problems from happening, and to deliver the right quality. Six Sigma helps you to build the business case for (quality) improvements, while agile incorporates mechanisms to continuously improve your products, and the way you work as a team.

        I have seen combinations of Agile and Lean, which succeed in delivering products earlier to customers, with the right quality. Savings, both in money and in a more effective and efficient workforce can be huge.

    2. Lucian Adrian

      An attempt to put quality in software products just by using the process is hard, if there is no buy-in from the people who actually write the code and do the implementation. In this race towards shorter and shorter implementation times, estimates are done without taking into account the time needed to put quality in.
      When estimating, people just put the “write code” time, or just the time strictly needed for doing that step, without considering all the lessons learned during their work experience. If a more experienced person says “it will take me 4 days”, with quality in mind, there might be some junior who will say “I can do it in 2”, but this one does not have all the quality building time included. Guess what will management choose ?

      1. BenLinders

        A process alone is never enough to improve. It’s the combination people-processes-tools, and in that order. Train and coach your professionals, and provide them room to develop themselves. Processes will help to synchtronise activities, and they can contribute to share best practices. But not to get people to work in a certain way.

        In a discussion on time-money-quality, it helps if you can quantify all of them. “I can do it in two days, but there will be 25% more defects from customers, which will cost you xx euro’s . The decision can still be to do it in two days, and to introduce the product with a lower quality, e.g. to be first on the market, or because the lower quality is acceptable for customers. But you’ve accepted that the total cost of ownership will be bigger, due to the maintenance and support costs that will come later.

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